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This is a modified version of the article originally released on the London School of Economics (LSE) Public Policy School publication.

Young people are paying a high price for the efforts to control COVID-19. But, argues Sid Mohasseb (University of Southern California), their experience of the pandemic puts them in a strong position to thrive in its aftermath — if older generations enable them to do so.

There is no denying that the pandemic has hit the youngest, or ‘Generation COVID’, hard, with disruption to their education, social lives and career planning. Generation C-ers (rather than previous generations who were defined by the year of their birth) will be known by their experiences, behavior and outlook, after coming of age during the pandemic.

But when the dust settles, there is evidence that the conditions of the pandemic — like world wars, recessions and depressions in the past — will unleash ‘Generation C’s’ ambition, resilience and raw creative energy. Combined with new technologies like digital living and AI, this could create a wave of innovation. Our job now is to create the policies (supported by governments, parents and wider society) that ‘Generation C’ needs, so they can rewrite the current script of business and unleash their talents post-COVID. …


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Ask for the moon

A version of this article first appeared on Forbes.com

Entrepreneurship is a team sport that requires active participants at every level. People with their ever-changing desires, expectations, needs and emotions are at the center of life and commerce. Unless you produce your product by yourself, market it to yourself, and buy it to solve a problem that only you have, you need others’ participation.

Business is the byproduct of the exchange between people and companies. Every business needs customers who receive value and pay for it, investors who help finance the growth and employees who innovate and execute. …


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A version of this article was published on CGTN on December 11th, 2020

To win the data battle, Big Tech should cut users in on the deal and govemrment and private sector should learn to get along in the interest of US national competitiveness

America must admit that it is slowly losing the AI race to China. After this admission, it should change course and realize that Silicon Valley is just one of many global tech hubs, along with Beijing.

It is opportunities in AI that will deliver the growth that, in the long-term, is needed to recover from the economic slump caused across North America and Europe by the pandemic, and usher in the job creation needed by the millions of newly unemployed. …


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LISTEN NOW

Futurist Trond Arne Undheim interviews Sid Mohasseb, author, investor, professor, and known as the entrepreneur philosopher.

In this conversation, they talk about The Future of Flux. Entrepreneurial philosophy. Personalizing your journey. Listening to the Guru near you. Evolve like a caterpillar — again and again.

The takeaway is that the deepest motivation behind entrepreneurship is to seek happiness. We can only learn if we are open to the possibility of learning everywhere around us. Anybody or anything could be the source of the final spark that leads to lasting insight. But we have to stay alert and we need to be ready for the reality of change, whether it be rapid or slow. …


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LISTEN NOW

FROM RADIO X: EVERYONE regardless of age, race, or occupation should listen in to this episode of FROM ZERO 2 REVENUE as Christopher Yap featured the Best Seller Author, Investor, and Professor, Sid Mohasseb, also known as the Entrepreneur Philosopher. Sid enlightened that we are all in fact, entrepreneurs and that we all have the ability to exchange our available resources for something better that we desire. What we do with this natural ability depends on which Personal Entrepreneurship Philosophy we identify ourselves with.

Listen to the full podcast here: https://lnkd.in/dSgWiWc


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Original Article Published on Forbes.com

Who chooses who?

Traditionally, employers offered a position, interviewed the candidates and negotiated the terms. They had all the options and all the power. Employers controlled the hours, location, compensation, and benefits. But all that is about to change drastically and rapidly.

The Slow Transition

At first, contracting was an idea conceived by employers in order to be able to fluctuate their employment base as needs oscillated. Some employers even used the contracting tactic to get around unions. …


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A modified version of this article was published on Forbes.com

The premise of “employee empowerment” needs to be challenged. The assumption is that leaders hold all the power and can then transfer that power to employees. But in reality, employees hold the true power of both thinking and doing. They apply their expertise and skill to shape a better future for your entire organization every day.

To achieve true empowerment, you have to allow employees to unleash their own power. As a result, they will be able to empower themselves. People are power owners regardless of their position within the organization. Employees control the customer relationship, product design and all aspects of execution. …


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A modified version of this article was originally published on Forbes.com

There is a flip side to this Covid 19 crisis. A hopeful side. An innovative side. A side that rewards creativity and collaboration. It’s controlled by the mother of invention: necessity.

The world is forcefully pushing past innovation resistance lines — lines that, when crossed, will change our lives forever. As we adjust to the changes in our lives, old and new innovations are being adopted as remedies.

Let’s consider some of the innovation resistance lines that are being erased: resistance lines that are drawn because people and businesses have been comfortable with old habits and processes. The psychological and bureaucratic borders drawn by those who claim “if ain’t broke, don’t fix it” and those who are afraid of change. Well, the crisis has broken the old, and it needs fixing. …


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Fired > Apprentice-style.

The average tenure of a CEO at his / her position is now a little over half (5 years) of what it was twenty years ago. In 2018, CEOs were being fired at an alarming rate; about 25% more than the previous year. The trend is continuing in 2019.


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For the past few years, my favorite example of IoT (Internet of Things) has been the use of devices on cows in Ireland to identify mating signals; as cows begin to have midnight strolls of certain patterns, algorithms can predict timing and inform the farmers to facilitate consummation. The result has been increased performance and productivity — more calves and more profits! As a technology lover and a believer of its ability to help us realize our next best version, I was delighted to get past cows and welcome the Internet of People!

Recently, I came across a company that has coined the phrase “Internet of People,” or IoP, an intelligent approach to connecting devices to people, places, and situations. In their pursuit of growth funding, we had an initial conversation that got me intrigued. The company was a serious player in a new space that was quickly shaping up and it helped put the IoT phenomena in a different light for me. I thought of what they do as an unintended, but fabulous, consequence of digital connectivity.

About

Sid MOHASSEB

Sid Mohasseb is an Author, Venture Investor, Innovation Leader, Serial Entrepreneur, University Professor, Adviser, Board Member & Business Thought Provoker.

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